In part 1 of this series, we achieved a simple proof-of-concept for a single-player text adventure game. In part 2, we added support for multiple players, but things got considerably more difficult and foreshadowed headaches with code organization. In this article, we are going to examine more closely the nascent…

In the previous article, we sketched out the foundations for making a text adventure in Elixir. …

I’m not much of a gamer. My parents were more of the old-school book-reading types, so we didn’t even own a television for many years, let alone a gaming console. But we did have a computer that ran Microsoft DOS 2.1, and that was enough to fire up a couple…

I have a confession… when I first heard about how Python forgoes the “confusing” soup of characters in favor of blank spaces to denote its blocks, I balked. In fact, I hated it. I became King Richard III and yelled “a semi-colon! a curly brace! My kingdom for a horse…

A couple years ago when I heard a Radiolab podcast episode about a computer programming tournament, I thought I would try to reproduce in code a framework similar to the one devised by Robert Alexrod back in 1980. …

This post is just a quick recap of how to do the cron-like task of executing code on a periodic basis in Elixir. In other languages, you might implement this using a sleep function, but behold this warning from ye olde Elixir docs:

For almost all situations where you would…

My first program was written in BASIC on an IBM PC Jr and featured GOTO lines. Times were tough in the days when you used cartridges to load programs.

My first real programming job used Perl (and vim as our IDE), and after that played out, I started doing freelance…

It always boggles my mind when smart developers pour hours and hours of their brilliant experience into coding an open-source package, and then they completely drop the ball when it comes to the delivery. From omitting installation instructions to the briefest of descriptions, packages that would otherwise be usable are…

Hear me out: developers cannot and should not solve big problems. Every time they try to mastermind some brilliant solution to a complex quandary, the endeavor collapses, crushing the sanity of those poor souls who must interpret and maintain the code.

It’s like watching a toddler try to shove too…

The last article I wrote about Dotenvy didn’t leave much room for demonstrating specific use-cases. So in this article I wanted to take one on: using Dotenvy with Elixir releases.

When you create an Elixir release, you create a self-contained directory that consists of your application code, all of its…

Everett Griffiths

Code person.

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